Lemon oil on the wrist

Everyday I post what we’ll be doing in class beneath the date. The pointing finger tells the students what they will need in class. Obviously today’s important resource was their brain.

Today was the Constitution test (the exclamation point). The big test. The test the students have to pass to pass 8th grade. There has been lots of stress and tension, some moaning and frazzled nerves around this test for weeks.

The dripping lemon at the bottom is what I give my students for all their tests— lemon oil specifically. I read somewhere that in Japan, the smell of lemon is suffused through the air systems of factories because it seems to help workers stay alert, think more clearly, feel mentally inspired, and stay on task.

Whether it is true or not is beside the point. Its placebo effect does the job. A little lemon oil on the wrist that the students can hold to their noses and breathe in, helps them to feel more control around their capacities as students. It also helps to diffuse the intensity. Many asked for a second helping halfway through the test today.

Well, back to grading the stack of Constitution tests. As it is getting later and later (and I do want to get these tests back to the kids tomorrow), perhaps a little lemon oil on the wrist would be the perfect lift I need to finish them all.

This entry was posted in Constitution, school, Teaching and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Lemon oil on the wrist

  1. Your class, your teaching, your being is so full of life even if it is a placebo! Be my teacher.

  2. ClaireMcA says:

    Yes, lemon is a good choice, I’ve just been putting together a ‘Concentration’ blend and refamiliarising myself with the essential oils indicated for concentration and memory, so I can tell you that with its bright, sour scent, lemon sharpens the focus of consciousness, clarifying and uplifting the intellect. It calms, lightens, and refreshes, dispersing confusion and easing worry. So probably a good idea for them to start using it days before the test!

    Something else I rediscovered was the origin of Laurel, another oil with properties that aid study. A symbol of triumph and achievement to Greeks and Romans, crowns of its leaves were worn by victorious generals, emperors and poets. In medieval times scholars and graduates were crowned with wreaths of laurel, or bacca laurea – from which the French baccalaureate (awarded on completion of secondary school) is derived.

    Bonne courage toute le monde!

  3. Jerome Bloom says:

    YOU

    COULD

    BACCA LAUREA

    YOUR STUDENTS

    WHENTHEY

    COMPLETE

    THEIRYEAR

    WITHYOU

  4. I wish you were my son’s teacher.
    I love lemon. And bay laurel.
    Will perhaps make a spritzer bottle of water infused with these two oils for my kid’s homework desks. They like to be refreshed by rose water. If I tell them I learned this from a really cool teacher I know on the web, they will likely go for it.
    Have a wonderful weekend! love, Suzi

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