A thousand blessings and a thousand mercies

Today JB discovered a mystery fruit growing where the beans, cucumbers, and sunflowers are growing. Neither of us remember planting anything else there. We do have acorn squash growing everywhere throughout the yard, because we had a rotten (but organic) squash last winter which JB tossed into the garden, bypassing any compost bin. But this is not squash.

We compost everything. It is a point of pride for us that all is recycled in the garden. In fact, over the years we believe we have added a good five inches of compost soil to the backyard. Each spring we put the compost all over the garden, complete with a heady earthy mulchy smell, spreading out the previous year’s leftovers. Of course, if the compost doesn’t heat up enough, seeds from fruits and vegetables are still viable.

And viable these were indeed. I must admit that we are pretty glad the compost didn’t heat up enough because —yum!  Surprise melons! Yes, it’s true we were a little too anxious to taste the melon. It should have been left on the vine a bit longer once discovered behind the sunflowers, entwined with beans, cucumbers, and those persistent morning glories. It could have sweetened up just a bit with a few more days in the sun. But who could resist?

How delicious anyway. Melons take a lot of water and we certainly had that this summer. And melons love hot sun and we definitely had our share of heat too. Acidic soil is also a boon. We’ll let the others grow a bit more including the five or six very small ones we discovered, growing on the bean strings near the roof of the garage.

According to Islamic “midrash” (or “hadith”), the prophet Mohammed said of melons, “Whenever you eat fruit, eat melon, because it is the fruit of Paradise and contains a thousand blessings and a thousand mercies. The eating of it cures every disease.”*

You just never know what will come out of the rot, the detritus, and the forgotten. Perhaps a thousand blessings and a thousand mercies.

*Foods of the Prophet by G.M. Chishti

(JB took the photo below.)

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10 Responses to A thousand blessings and a thousand mercies

  1. Next time I eat a melon I will think of it as fruit of Paradise. That has a wonderful sound to it. Thank you! Glad you found your treasure.

  2. G & I are addicted to melons and eat them as early in the Spring as possible to as late in the Fall as possible. And then we eat possible when it is available. We had your cucumbers (pickle size, round size, and long size) with dinner and the tomatoes. When can we show up with our bushel basket?

  3. Mrs. Chili says:

    What a wonderful gift!

  4. Jerome Bloom says:

    ACTUALLY THE COMPOST
    IS SOMETIMES RATHER SHITY SMELLING
    IN A VERY EARTHY WAY ALWAYS PROVIDING
    NOURISHMENT AND SURPRISES
    WHAT NEXT?
    WHO KNOWS? WAIT AND SEE

    SEARCHING FOR THE IDENTITY
    OF THE MYSTERY FRUIT
    I GOOGLED MELONS
    CAME UP WITH
    WOMEN’S BREASTS
    FOR PROVIDING MILK
    FOR BABIES

    GOOGLED
    MELONS FRUIT
    CAME UP WITH
    MANY MELON CHOICES
    THINK WE ARE GROWING
    MUSKMELONS
    WHEN NEXT RIPENS
    WE WILL SMELL
    AND PRESS THE FLOWER END
    TO SEE IF IT IS SOFT
    AND RIPE
    AND
    A GREAT TASTING SWEET
    MUSKY MELON

    VERY GOOD FOR

    ONE’S CIRCULATION
    INDEED

  5. Loved the allegory…is that the right word? Out of the weeds emerges the fruit of goodness….. Lovely writing!

  6. Yummy, yummy! Melon seeds are very hardy, too – once I had one sprouting from the garbage disposal.

    Thanks for sharing – melon certainly keeps your digestive system moving and tastes delicious, as well.

  7. Wow, coincidentally, I got a melon at the farmers’ market and thought it was odd to find such a creature there, but your post helps to explain why it would turn up in Michigan, of all places. What a find, and what a garden!

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